environment

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…and the people who look to her as a potential leader (read “teabaggers”) are extremely STUPID assholes.

Sarah Palin supports exterminating wolves in Alaska, a state she used to govern. For half of her legal term.

Wolves change their environment for the better.

So, here’s one more reason to believe that Republicans and baggers live and vote for a worse place for all of us to live. Because they’re either stupid or brainwashed.

Video posted below the fold for the download rate challenged.

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Statistical analysis rules out natural-warming hypothesis with more than 99% certainty

Sorry, but the belief that 7 Billion people don’t affect the planet is just too stupid to argue about.

Embrace that we affect the planet. Embrace that we affect the environment. Or embrace that you are too stupid to engage in reasoned debate. I’m looking at you, Oklahoma.

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We have to stop shitting where we live.

Study: Dead sea creatures covered 98% of seafloor last year about 150 miles off California coast; Unprecedented, had been below 1% prior to event — ‘Major’ changes began in spring 2011

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Has anyone posting here read this?

Ishmael is a 1992 philosophical novel by Daniel Quinn. It examines mythology, its effect on ethics, and how that relates to sustainability. The novel uses a style of Socratic dialogue to deconstruct the notion that humans are the pinnacle of biological evolution. It posits that human supremacy is a cultural myth, and asserts that modern civilization is enacting that myth with dangerous consequences. It was awarded the $500,000 Turner Tomorrow Fellowship Award.

::snip::

Ishmael begins with a newspaper ad: “Teacher seeks pupil. Must have an earnest desire to save the world. Apply in person.” The nameless narrator and protagonist begins his story, telling how he first reacted to this ad with scorn because of the absurdity of “wanting to save the world,” a notion he feels that once he foolishly embraced himself as an adolescent during the counterculture movement of the 1960s. However, he responds to the ad anyway and, upon arriving at the address, finds himself in a room with a gorilla. He notices a polysemous sign that reads “With man gone, will there be hope for gorilla?”

To the narrator’s surprise, he finds that the gorilla, calling himself Ishmael, can communicate telepathically. At first baffled by this, the man learns the story of how the gorilla came to be here and soon accepts Ishmael as his teacher, regularly returning to Ishmael’s office throughout the plot. The novel continues from this point mainly as a Socratic dialogue between Ishmael and his new student as they hash out what Ishmael refers to as “how things came to be this way” for mankind.

I think I want to read it, myself.

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If you haven’t figured it out, by now, I love animals and think (generally) that humans are selfish, greedy pricks. (I’m reasonably certain I’m a human, so there may be some exceptions. :-))

So this was good news.

Indian animal welfare officials moved this week to block plans to put performing dolphins on display at theme parks and malls across the country, saying it would violate federal laws about cruelty to animals.

At least five dolphin park proposals have been floated in recent years by businesses and local governments, with the plans aimed at providing India’s increasingly affluent middle class with a new and exotic form of entertainment.

In a letter Monday the Animal Welfare Board of India directed state governments and wildlife wardens to block any efforts to capture or transport dolphins, or to keep dolphins, porpoises or whales in captivity. The board ruled that dolphin shows and exhibits would violate the 1960 Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act.

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Three simple numbers that add up to global catastrophe – and that make clear who the real enemy is

Long article, but worth reading when you have the time.

First two paragraphs:

If the pictures of those towering wildfires in Colorado haven’t convinced you, or the size of your AC bill this summer, here are some hard numbers about climate change: June broke or tied 3,215 high-temperature records across the United States. That followed the warmest May on record for the Northern Hemisphere – the 327th consecutive month in which the temperature of the entire globe exceeded the 20th-century average, the odds of which occurring by simple chance were 3.7 x 10-99, a number considerably larger than the number of stars in the universe.

Meteorologists reported that this spring was the warmest ever recorded for our nation – in fact, it crushed the old record by so much that it represented the “largest temperature departure from average of any season on record.” The same week, Saudi authorities reported that it had rained in Mecca despite a temperature of 109 degrees, the hottest downpour in the planet’s history.

(Emphasis by TB3.)

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(Reuters) – Oppressive heat and a worsening drought in the U.S. Midwest pushed grain prices near or past records on Monday as crops wilted, cities baked and concerns grew about food and fuel price inflation in the world’s top food exporter.

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On Tuesday, for the first time, government scientists are saying recent extreme weather events are likely connected to man-made climate change. It’s the conclusion of a report by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The report says last year’s record drought in Texas was made “roughly 20 times more likely” because of man made climate change, specifically meaning warming that comes from greenhouse gasses like carbon dioxide. The study, requested by NOAA, looked at 50 years of weather data in Texas and concluded that man-made warming had to be a factor in the drought.

The head of NOAA’s climate office, Tom Karl, said: “What we’re seeing, not only in Texas but in other phenomena in other parts of the world, where we can’t explain these events by natural variability alone. They’re just too rare, too uncommon.”

More at the link.

Up next: Famine!

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December 31, 2010

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Protection for fragile sea turtles

The Obama administration on Friday announced new protections off the California Coast and large sections of the Pacific Ocean aimed at helping populations of the endangered leatherback sea turtle recover after years of decline.

The National Marine Fisheries Services designated more that 40,000 square miles of Pacific Coast waters as “critical habitat” for the turtle, a fragile species that can grow to the size of a compact car.

“That’s groundbreaking in terms of conservation of sea turtles,” said Geoff Shester, California program director for Monterey-based Oceana.

The largest of all sea turtles, the leatherback travels to the West Coast from Indonesia to feed on the Monterey Bay’s abundance of jellyfish. The protected habitat announced Friday runs from Point Arena to Point Arguello in California and from Oregon’s Cape Blanco north to the Canadian border.

For several years environmentalists have been seeking the added protections for the reptile, a species susceptible to everything from fishing nets to ship strikes to egg poaching. The leatherback’s numbers have dwindled by 95 percent since the 1980s.

More at the link.

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